Wednesday, July 1, 2020

GenFriends: Traditions of the Ancestors (TOTA) with Michael Felts



Cheri and the panel Dan Earl, Laura Hedgecock, and Mary Kircher Roddy welcome guest Micheal Felts, the founder of the TOTA project. We learn how this website can help us research and learn about the historical and cultural context influencing our ancestors.
Tabs link to cultures and topics. A search bar helps to narrow down a subject.
We explore parts of the website and discuss the importance of having a place to keep all types of archival items publically and privately and the process of how articles are vetted and certified to make sure content is safe and reliable.

As an example of the articles found Cheri shared some she had discovered:
-French Woman and Home LIfe
-Captain Hook in Tahiti
-Children's Dress in Colonial Days
-Video-African American Spirituals of the Civil War
-Gusirucak Sketches of the Cherokee
-Passover Dishes 1895

Something for all cultures and time periods to help you fill in the story of your family.

Watch as we learn about this free site helping to tell and preserve the traditions of our ancestors.




Links in this episode:
TOTA World
TOTA World FB Page
TOTAWorld Geneabloggers


Mary Kircher Roddy-MKR Genealogy
Cheri Hudson Passey-Carolina Girl Genealogy


Have you explored this TOTAWorld.com?
We'd love to hear about what you found!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Monday, June 29, 2020

Methodology Monday-Using the Genealogical Proof Standard to Guide Your Genealogy Journey





Methodology Monday has focused on the 5 Elements of the Genealogical Proof Standard to help the many who have asked questions about the how and why of using these standards.

Questions and comments from readers, class participants, and those attending my presentations have wondered if they needed to learn and study the GPS when they are not planning on doing research professionally.  

My answer is always YES! If you want your research to be based on solid ground, to be credible and not at high risk of being proven incorrect, the elements contained in the GPS need to be applied for every person and family you are gathering information on. 

Need a refresher on what the GPS is and how to use it?
Here are my posts on each part of the process.

Reasonably Exhaustive Research
Source Citations
Analysis and Correlation
Resolving Conflicts
The How and Why of Sound Conclusions





Want to know more? Want to be able to take the GPS step by step and practice using your own research?
Introducing my new class:
The Genealogical Proof Standard: A Guide for Your Genealogy Journey

 A self-paced class! Sign up and take as long as you need to complete each of the four lessons.
An optional Facebook group has been created for asking questions, leaving comments, and getting to know others who are participating in the class. 


What will we be learning?
Here's an outline for the month of classes:


Lesson 1-Reasonably Exhaustive Research
Gathering the Information
Lesson 2-Complete and Accurate Citations
Leaving a Trail to Follow
Lesson 3-Analysis, Correlation, and Conflicting Evidence
Taking a Good Look
Lesson 4- The Written Conclusion
Summing it Up

Each lesson includes a video and written Lesson, resource materials, and an assignment.
The homework assignment is not mandatory and will not be graded.
The purpose is to help you put the things you are learning into practice.
If you choose to do the homework and send it to me and I will give you positive feedback and helpful suggestions.



This class is for beginners as well as those who have more research experience. 
 It will help build good habits and sharpen skills.

How do you register?
The class is hosted on Research Write Connect, a learning platform from Lisa Also,
Click here to sign up and receive $20 off by using the coupon code: GPS20
The code is good until July 7, 2020.


Hope to see you in class!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,






Sunday, June 28, 2020

This Week On My Family History Calendar




June 28~
  Alpheus J. Baker, my paternal 3rd great grandfather was born 196 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina. His father was Jesse Hinton Baker (1795-1866). The name of his mother was thought to be Nancy Wilder but that research has been disputed and more needs to be done to determine the correct mother.

Alpheus J. Baker

My great grandparents, William Treadford Roberts and Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts would be celebrating their 106th anniversary on this day. Wiliam was 20 and Bessie Mae 17 when, as family lore says, they snuck away from their homes in Richland County, South Carolina, and eloped.




William and Beulah Mae Roberts
Wedding Day
28 June 1914




Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!




You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection, or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.








My Happy Dance Moment for this week: 
To prepare for an upcoming virtual institute class, I attended a Zoom meeting to get the students acquainted with the technology we would be using.  During the meeting, I received a private message. It turns out someone else attending the meeting had a genealogy connection with one of my ancestors! We are both descendants of Benjamin Reese Gibson of Clarendon County, SC.  Me through this man who was my 3rd great grandfather, a slaveholder, and the person who contacted me through one of his enslaved. 
We will work together to share records and information on the family.
Genealogy Serendipity strikes again!


What had you doing the Happy Dance this week?




                                                                      

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Thursday, June 25, 2020

NGS and FamilySearch Virtual Family History Conference Registration Ending Soon!







 NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY®
6400 Arlington Blvd., Suite 810
Falls Church, VA 22042-2318
Phone 703-525-0050 or 800-473-0060
ngsgenealogy.org


     Press Release


Contact: Courtney Holmes
Phone: 703-525-0050                                                                                                         
cholmes@ngsgenealogy.org                                                                                            
For Release: 29 June 2020

Registration Ends 7 July for
Six International and Ethnic Workshops

FALLS CHURCH, VA, 29 JUNE 2020Time is running out to register for six international and ethnic workshops on German, Hispanic, Irish, Italian, Native American, and Swedish heritages, respectively. Registration ends on Tuesday, July 7. Presented live online and hosted by the National Genealogical Society (NGS) and FamilySearch, the workshops will be scheduled between 14 July and 17 July. Each will be two hours in length. Information and registration for the workshops is available on the NGS Conference website.

Research specialists from the world-renowned Family History Library will conduct the workshops. Several moderators will assist with the Q&A portion of each workshop as well as with technical questions.

Reading Italian Records Workshop
Brandon Baird, AG, will teach participants how to read Italian civil registration records and church records. Fluency in Italian is not required.

Hispanic Research Methodology Workshop
Arturo Cuellar, AG, and Lyn Turner, AG, will provide instruction on how to research ancestors in Mexico, Latin America, and Spain. This workshop for beginners will cover basic research guidelines, finding aids, and language helps, along with a case study.

Strategies for Locating German Records Workshop
Camille Andrus, AG, will discuss the records of your German immigrant ancestor, help you identify what records are available, where they’re located, and how to use them effectively. This workshop is for those beginning research in Germany who have identified their ancestor’s hometown and are ready to research in Germany.

Swedish Research Strategy Workshop
Geoff Morris, AG, will lead a workshop on how to approach common problems and tackle them in an efficient way. Elements will include analysis, translation, records, and prioritizing research steps.

Ireland: Discovering Where and How They Lived Workshop
Craig Foster, AG, Dan Poffenberger, AG, Kori Robbins, AG, and Phil Dunn, AG, will provide insight on family history research in Ireland, a country that presents unique challenges in genealogical research. This workshop will help people understand Irish jurisdictions, as well as key record groups.

Native American Workshop
Lyn Rasmussen, CG, Forrest Emmett, and Hellen Bileen will focus on using 20th-century records as the foundation for researching Native American ancestry.

Prior to each workshop, registrants will receive an electronic handout. Event moderators and NGS staff will assist anyone who is unsure about how to participate in the virtual workshops.

Each workshop costs $35. Register soon to reserve your spot in these expert led workshops. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 July.

For more information about the international and ethnic workshops, or to register, visit our conference website.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Falls Church, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.
###



Wednesday, June 24, 2020

GenFriends: University of Virginia Memorial to Enlaved Laborers with Shelley Murphy





Shelley Murphy, aka Family Tree Girl, a panelist on our show, shares her experiences researching the descendants of the enslaved whose labor was used to build UVA. Shelley shares with Cheri, Melissa Barker, Bernice Bennett, Dan Earl, and Laura Hedgecock how she became involved, her research process, and the continuation of the project.

There is much to learn from Shelley in this presentation. Watch as she shares the way she has been able to connect African American families together to honor the memory of those who were hired out by their owners to build the university.








Links in this Episode:
Slavery and the University
UVA Memorial-PBS Story
UVA Memorial Enslaved Laborers
The Making of The Memorial for Enslaved Laborers 
Jefferson's University-the Early Life
President's Commission on Slavery and the University



Contact the Panelists:
Bernice Bennett-Geniebroots
Shelley Murphey-The Family Tree Girl
Cheri Hudson Passey-Carolina Girl Genealogy


Do you have ancestors who may have been part of the building of UVA or ancestors where were enslavers of those who were?
We'd love to hear from you!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, June 21, 2020

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!





You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection, or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.








My Happy Dance Moment for this week: 

Putting my great grandfather Jubal Early's family together has been an eye-opener. He had three wives and 6 children. I don't think any of them knew about the others. Researching through some NC records, I found this birth certificate for his second child from his first marriage.
Another piece to the puzzle that was his unconventional life. Happy Dance!!

What prompted me to look this week? Joining in on the NC Summer Series!
Check out their first two sessions on YouTube and subscribe to get a notification for the rest of the season! 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzeXn7B9Rqk&t=14s

What had you doing the Happy Dance this week?




                                                                      

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Wednesday, June 17, 2020

GenFriends: The Slave Dwelling Project with Joseph McGill



In this episode of GenFriends, we welcome Joseph McGill the founder of the Slave Dwelling Project. Joe joins Cheri and panel Melissa Barker, Bernice Bennett, Dan Earl, Laura Hedgecock, Shelley Murphey, and Mary Kircher Roddy to talk about the ten years since the project began, the efforts to save and preserve the dwellings and stories of the enslaved and what's planned for the future.

Watch as we welcome Joe for a fun, fast pasted, enlightening discussion!







Links Mentioned in This Episode:
The Slave Dwelling Project
NPR: Honoring Slaves by Sleeping in Their Cabins
The Slave Dwelling Project Facebook Page



Contact the Panelists:
Bernice Bennett-Geniebroots
Shelley Murphey-The Family Tree Girl
Mary Kircher Roddy-MKR Genealogy
Cheri Hudson Passey-Carolina Girl Genealogy


Have you heard Joe speak or participated in a conference or sleepover?
We'd love to hear your experiences!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,






Sunday, June 14, 2020

This Week On My Family History Calendar




June 16~
 Sarah Rebecca (Smith) Fleming Hudson (1835-1916) my paternal great great grandmother would have been 185 years old on this day. Born in Sumter District, South Carolina, Sarah was the daughter of Henry John Smith (1807-1949) and Martha Julia (Epps) Smith (1808-1854).


Possible photo of
Sarah Rebecca (Smith) Fleming Hudson
©Cheri Hudson Passey
       
    Any help identifying this picture would be appreciated!

June 17~

 My maternal great grandfather, Manning David Daughrity, Jr. (1889-1931) was born in Sumter County, South Carolina 131 years ago. David was the son of Manning David Daughrity, Sr. (1844-1918) and Mary Elizabeth (Stafford) Daughrity (1843-1930).

Manning David Daughrity, Jr.
About 1930
©Cheri Hudson Passey


Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,




Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!




You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection, or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.







My Happy Dance Moment for this week: 

This week, I had the privilege of being the speaker for Vivid-Pix. Their webinar series is held live on Friday nights and then the recorded version can be seen on their website under education. 

Teaching the class on organization was fun and it was great to have people attend live. That in and of itself was a happy dance moment. Another happy dance moment came when I used their software to enhance a couple of photos I wanted to share during the webinar.

Photo of David Daughrity and daughter Mildred taken about 1914

Photo of Loretta McManus Daughrity taken about 1932





All I can say is wow! I can see the faces more clearly and the background images are more in focus. I can see what part of the house they were taken and imagine what it would have been like when I visit. 
Another great week for happy dances!



What had you doing the Happy Dance this week?




                                                                      

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,